Maureen Giuliano - Classified Realty Group


Classified Realty Group



Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 12/15/2017

Attending an open house is a great way to learn a great deal about a home in a relatively short amount of time. It allows you to see inside the home with your own eyes, enabling you to notice details that are omitted in photos, whether itís a noisy neighborhood or a smelly basement.

Aside from learning about the home, an open house is also an opportunity to help real estate agents learn about you. Being prepared and professional at an open house could set you apart from other, more casual, attendees helping you make a good impression.

Since most of us donít attend open houses on the regular, and since there probably isnít an Open House Etiquette 101 course you can take at your local college, it can be difficult to know exactly how to prepare for an open house. How should you dress? Should you take notes? Is it rude to take photos? Which questions are welcome and which should be avoided?

In this article, weíll help demystify the open house, leaving you more prepared to leave a positive impression when you go to see what could potentially be your future home.

Appearance

How should you dress when attending an open house? An open house is neither a funeral nor a trip to the beach. The realtor showing the house likely isnít a fashion critic-theyíre there to answer your questions.

In most cases, casual clothing is appropriate. Since youíll be touring the house and yard, however, you might want to avoid heels.

Questions and conversation

An open house is your time to learn all of the relevant facts about a house. Good questions to ask include upgrades to the house, how many offers it has received, and the current ownerís timeline (when they want or need to close by).

There are other topics youíll want to avoid. Donít ask too many personal questions about the sellers. It will make the real estate agent, understandably, uncomfortable. Also be sure not to reveal too many details about yourself. You donít want to mention things like your spending limit as this will remove some of your powers of negotiation.

Itís okay if the furniture and decorations in the home arenít your taste, but itís a bad idea to criticize these items as you tour the house, as you may offend the agent or owners who have decorated.

Being respectful of the owner'sí space

Even though the house is for sale, itís still someoneís home. Itís inadvisable to bring food or drinks without a secure cap into an open house.

We live in a time when everyone photographs and shares everything. But avoid the temptation to take photos when youíre at an open house. Would you want someone going through your home, taking pictures of your valuables, and then sharing them online? Instead, refer back to photos that are available online or from the agent.

When it comes to touring the house, all of the rooms should be viewable. In fact, if thereís a room you canít enter for any reason this should raise a red flag that something is wrong with the home. However, just because you should look in the closets to get an idea of space doesnít mean you should touch or go through the personal belongings of the homeowner.


Follow all of the above open house tips and youíll be sure to leave a good impression.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 12/8/2017

Looking to purchase your first home? Not sure if you want to purchase a single-family home or a condo? What you purchase will be determinant on your thoughts about the below information. Take a look at the various differences between single-family homes and condos and decide the pros and cons for yourself. Location: Based on your price range, you will typically be able to purchase a condo in a location where you would otherwise not be able to purchase a home. But in return, you are often getting less square footage, closer by neighbors, and smaller outdoor living space. If you sacrifice a downtown city location for a location right outside of the city, you will get more for your money. Do you want to be able to walk to restaurants, shops and maybe work or is a home with free parking a more attractive option to you? It all depends on what is most important to you. Privacy: There will be less privacy when owning a condo versus a home, as neighbors are much closer. Condos typically share a wall with one another, some on just one side and some on both sides. This is an important detail to take into consideration when deciding between a condo and single-family home. Additional Costs: HOA fees or homeowner association fees are monthly fees that condo owners must pay. The fees cover things such as utilities, reserve and contingency funds, amenities, maintenance and repairs, which includes lawn care, snow removal, trash removal, exterior upkeep, etc. These costs vary depending on the condo amenities and policies. However, itís important to be aware that there is the possibility that these fees increase if there is not enough in the reserve to cover unforeseen costs. When owning a home, there are no HOA fees. This means that a homeowner needs to be cognizant of the additional costs of owning a home. Will you purchase a lawnmower and snow blower or hire a service? Will you have the additional funds to pay for unforeseen expenses? These are important questions to consider. Restrictions: Owning a condo has some limitations as there will be restrictions that would not exist when owning your own home (unless you purchase a historical home). There are often restrictions dealing with the exterior of your home, parking restrictions as well as having certain barbecues on decks. Condos are an attractive choice for those looking for a low maintenance lifestyle. And owning and maintaining a home will take more work on the homeownerís part. Itís important to figure out exactly what you want out of a home before you decide on one or the other, but knowing the difference between a single-family home and a condo is a first step.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 12/1/2017

For those who recently bought or sold a house, it may be only a matter of time before you need to pack up your belongings and move them to a new address. As such, you'll likely need to figure out how to properly pack your artwork to reduce the risk of damage while moving.

Luckily, we're here to help you take the guesswork out of packing your artwork prior to moving day.

Let's take a look at three best practices for packing artwork.

1. Use Acid-Free Tissue Paper

Acid-free tissue paper offers advanced protection against moisture Ė a serious problem that may cause artwork to fade or deteriorate.

You should have no trouble finding acid-free tissue paper at any store that sells moving and packing supplies. Plus, acid-free tissue paper usually is inexpensive and can make a world of difference as you pack up your artwork.

Ideally, you'll want to wrap an entire piece of art in acid-free tissue paper. This will offer immense protection until you unwrap your artwork once you reach your new home.

2. Take Advantage of Specialty Boxes

Specialty moving boxes are available for artwork. Pick up a few of these boxes, and you can pack your artwork accordingly.

Use caution as you place artwork inside a moving box. Ensure the artwork is secure inside the box before you seal the box as well.

Also, don't forget to label all moving boxes, including those that contain artwork. Place a "Fragile" label on boxes that contain artwork to further minimize the risk of damage during your move.

3. Store Artwork Carefully in a Moving Truck

When moving day arrives, you'll want to do everything possible to guarantee your artwork travels safely from Point A to Point B. If you place artwork on its edges and in a spot where it won't fall over inside a moving truck, you can limit the chance that your artwork will get damaged while in transit.

In addition, you may be able to wedge artwork between heavy objects in a moving truck. That way, you can secure your artwork throughout the moving cycle.

If you require extra help as you pack your artwork and other belongings, it often pays to hire a professional moving company. This business employs friendly, knowledgeable moving experts who can help you streamline the process of getting all of your belongings to a new address.

Lastly, a real estate agent is happy to put you in touch with moving companies in your area. This housing market professional understands the challenges associated with packing artwork and other items and can provide plenty of support as you get ready for moving day. Furthermore, a real estate agent will ensure anyone can achieve the optimal results during the homebuying or home selling cycle.

Simplify the process of packing up your artwork Ė use the aforementioned best practices, and you can quickly and effortlessly prepare your artwork for moving day.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 11/24/2017

If you intend to list your residence, you'll need to think about how you'll price your residence. However, what you initially paid for your home is unlikely to match its value today. And if you set an initial asking price that is too high, you risk alienating potential homebuyers.

Lucky for you, we're here to help you determine the ideal initial asking price for your residence to increase the likelihood of a fast home sale.

Now, let's take a look at three quick, easy ways to establish a competitive price for your house.

1. Look at Housing Market Data

Housing market data is easy to find and can show you how your residence stacks up against recently sold homes in your area.

Evaluate the prices of recently sold local residences that are comparable to your own. With this housing market data in hand, you can better understand pricing trends for houses in your city or town.

In addition, don't forget to check out the prices of available houses in your region. This housing market data will help you understand the current state of the real estate market.

2. Conduct a Home Appraisal

A home appraisal is valuable because it allows you to receive a property valuation from a home expert. When the appraisal is complete, you may be able to prioritize various home improvement projects as well.

During a home appraisal, a property expert will examine your home's interior and exterior. This property expert also will assess the prices of recently sold and available homes in your area, including the prices of residences in your neighborhood. Following the appraisal, you'll receive a property valuation.

If a property valuation falls below your initial expectations, there is no need to worry. Remember, you can always perform assorted home maintenance and upgrades to boost your house's value.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

Work with a real estate agent throughout the home selling process Ė you'll be glad you did. A real estate agent will go above and beyond the call of duty to ensure that you can get the best price for your residence, regardless of the housing market's conditions.

A real estate agent first will learn about you, your home and your home selling goals. Next, this housing market professional will list your residence, promote it to large groups of homebuyers and host home showings and open house events. If a homebuyer submits an offer on your residence, your real estate agent will help you analyze the proposal and determine whether to accept, reject or counter it.

Furthermore, a real estate agent is happy to respond to any home selling questions. This housing market professional knows exactly what it takes to sell a residence, and as such, is ready to respond to your home selling queries at all times.

Get the best price for your home Ė use the aforementioned tips, and you can price your house appropriately.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 11/17/2017

Are you on the fence about whether to buy a house with a big back yard? Although it's not always a bed of roses -- especially when it comes to upkeep -- the benefits can easily outweigh the drawbacks. Spacious yards are extremely versatile and can play a key role in creating fond family memories. Here's some food for thought on how you can use that extra outdoor space on your property to accommodate your interests, your goals, and your family's needs.

  1. Cultivate a vegetable garden. If you have a green thumb and a passion for growing your own food, a big yard can afford you that opportunity. Backyard agriculture is something the whole family can enjoy and get involved in. It's also a fun way to educate your kids about nature, farming, and where their food comes from. As a side note: If you're serious about pursuing this hobby, you may want to have an adjacent shed set up to protect your gardening tools, fertilizer, and other supplies. Building a greenhouse for growing flowers is another option to consider. Once you get backyard farming down to a science, you can save money on groceries and enjoy an abundant supply of organically grown fruits and vegetables. There are many sources of helpful information, both online and off, including Cornell Cooperative Extension.
  2. Special occasions: When you have room for a couple of picnic tables, a swing set, and a volleyball court (60 feet by 30 feet), then you have the basic ingredients for fun birthday parties, family gatherings, and backyard barbecues. Plenty of space also lends itself to frisbee games, badminton, Bocce ball, croquet, kickball, and anything else your group is up for. Whether you're planning a family reunion, a graduation party, a child's birthday, or a backyard wedding, a good-size residential property can provide the perfect setting.
  3. Expansion is an option. When your new house comes with some extra outdoor space to work with, all kinds of options are available to you. The possibilities can range from the construction of a sun room or additional bedroom to an in-law apartment or even a guest house with rental income potential. If a new swimming pool is on your "wish list," a spacious lot can help make that a reality.
  4. Room to run and play: You may have an energetic Labrador Retriever that loves to play fetch or a growing family that thrives on sports activities. Regardless, there's nothing like a big back yard to make all that possible. During the winter months, you can even use a multi-acre property for cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling. Creating your own skating ring is yet another option.
If you're looking for a "park-like setting" for your next home, then a large suburban or rural property might be exactly what you have in mind. Depending on the layout of the property and its proximity to other houses, an acre or more of land can provide just the right amount of privacy, flexibility, and freedom from traffic sounds, sirens, and other noise pollution.