Maureen Giuliano - Classified Realty Group


Classified Realty Group



Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 11/10/2017

If you’re looking to make your home smell nice, but aren’t sure about using chemical air fresheners for your home, you can turn to the natural odors that nature provides. Below, you’ll find some of the best natural air fresheners and how to use them to make your home smell fresh and clean. 


Lemon And Rosemary


Who knew that one of the best natural air fresheners was right in your kitchen? All you need is a mason jar, vanilla extract, rosemary, water, and lemon. Mix together and leave in the jar for a fanatic smell. 


Lilac Room Spray


You can leave your home smelling like springtime the whole year through. Just combine water, vodka, and lilac oil in a container with a sprayer. This compound is the ultimate room refresher.


Natural Carpet Freshener


You can freshen your carpets quickly and naturally by combining baking soda, dried rosemary, and lavender right on your carpets. Just let the mixture sit on rugs for about 15-20 minutes, then vacuum it up and voila, you’ll have quite a fresh smelling room. 


Natural Refills For Plug-In Air Fresheners


You don’t need to throw away empty plug-in the wall air fresheners. You can reuse the glass container. You can use your favorite essential oils and water, place back in the jar, and keep your rooms smelling fresh and clean.


Fall Into A Season


If you’re not a fan of burning candles, you can combine cinnamon oil, orange oil, and water. Boil it together, and your home will smell like a fresh fall day. 


Stove-Top Potpurris


There isn’t really any one particular scent that you have to use in your potpourris. Just look for recipes that intrigue you. Your home will smell like a new world when you combine sweet and spicy smells to make a long-lasting scent out of potpourri.


Make Your Own Diffuser


To make your own reed diffuser, all you need is a small glass container, rattan reeds, alcohol, almond oil, and your favorite essential oil. Some examples would be lemon oil or lavender oil. It all depends on what room you’re using the diffuser in and what effect you hope to have. The reeds soak in the scent, giving it off to the entire room. 


As with many kinds of cleaning around your home, you don’t need fancy cleaning products or air fresheners. Things that you probably already have in your home can work as great cleaners, deodorizers, and odor neutralizers. Give these natural air fresheners a try and see if they make a difference in your home.          







Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 1/25/2015

For most of us cleaning is no fun. There are some hidden secrets that can make cleaning just a little bit easier. Here are some little known cleaning tips: -Remove grease and dirt build up from kitchen cabinets. Say to clean cabinets, 1st heat slightly damp sponge or cloth in microwave for 20 - 30 seconds until it's hot. Put on a pair of rubber gloves, spray cabinets with an all-purpose cleaner containing orange oil, then wipe off cleaner with a hot sponge. -Soak old paintbrushes in hot vinegar for 30 minutes and good as new. -Clean that oily, sticky residue off of appliances with a little Cream of Tarter mixed with a few drops of water, add some scrubbing! -Get a clean microwave by filling a microwaveable bowl with 1-2 cups of water and add a dash of vinegar (about a tablespoon or two). Put the bowl in the microwave, shut the door, and turn it on for 5 minutes. -Chalk will remove grease stains from clothes. Simply rub the stain with chalk, then toss in the wash as normal.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 12/12/2012

White distilled vinegar is effective for killing most mold, bacteria and germs due to it's high level of acidity. Vinegar is a weak form of acetic acid that is made from the fermentation of sugars and starches. White vinegar has so many different uses in the home; it is considered the “miracle cleaner”. It is pocketbook friendly, all natural, safe for pets and nontoxic. Why would you use anything else? It is a good idea to purchase two empty spray bottles, keep one full with pure white vinegar and the other with half water and half vinegar. This just makes it easier to dispense and have on hand at all times. A person can work wonders cleaning their home naturally just armed with vinegar and water. There are so many different uses for white vinegar in your home. Here are just a few ideas. Vinegar mixed with water is an excellent cleaner for all kitchen surfaces like counter tops, refrigerators and stove tops. To shine chrome fixtures simply make a paste of 2 tablespoons salt and 1 teaspoon white vinegar. To clean wooden cutting boards simply just wipe with vinegar. Clean refrigerator shelves with a solution of ½ white vinegar and water. Did you know that soaking fruit and vegetables in 1 part vinegar to 3 parts water can remove up to 98% bacteria? Soak fruit and vegetables for at least 10 minutes then rinse to get best results. Vinegar is also useful in the laundry. To decrease lint in laundry add ½ cup straight white vinegar to rinse cycle. To make your bright’s brighter add ½ cup vinegar to the rinse cycle. If you have pets white vinegar is a good solution to have in house. If your dog has the mishap of getting sprayed by a skunk, use dilution of vinegar and water, rub dog’s fur then rinse with warm water. Repeat a couple times. To keep dogs from scratching their ears rub them with a cloth diluted with vinegar and water. Vinegar is so versatile in the home. You do not have to worry about the vinegar smell remaining after you use it because the smell dissipates after it dries. So, for people who believe in living green and healthy, white vinegar is a must have in the pantry closet.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 2/26/2012

In the North Reading and Reading area hardwood floors are usually the buyer's first choice in flooring.Hardwood floors that are in good condition can really help sell a home.  It seems everyone has an opinion on the best way to wash hardwood floors. Some say soap and water, others polish, or wax. It can all be very confusing.
These tips from iVillage take the guesswork out of cleaning wood floors and go from dull and grimy to gleaming and gorgeous in a few easy steps.
First Things First—Determine the Finish Before you grab a bucket of water and a mop, it's best to find out how your wood floor is sealed—if at all. Why? The finish, not the wood type, determines how you clean and care for the floor. Surface-sealed floors: Most new wood floors are sealed with urethane, polyurethane or polyacrylic. Surface-sealed floors are stain and water-damage resistant and easiest to care for and clean: Sweep, mop and you're done! Penetrating-seal-treated and oil-treated floors: Also common, a penetrating seal or oil finish soaks into the wood grain and hardens. This type of floor must be pampered and protected with liquid or paste wax. Lacquered, varnished, shellacked and untreated floors: Although technically surface finishes, lacquers, varnishes and shellacs are not as resistant to moisture, spills and wear as the other sealants mentioned. Treat floors with these finishes and floors with no finish as you would penetrating-seal-treated and oil-treated floors. Not sure what kind of finish you have? To tell the difference in a pinch, just rub your finger across the floor. If no smudge appears, the floor is surface sealed. If you do create a smudge, the floor has been treated with a penetrating seal, oil finish, shellac, varnish or lacquer, and then waxed.
Cleaning Surface-Sealed Floors
Product Do's and Don'ts Don't use oils, waxes or furniture sprays. Oil leaves a residue, furniture spray creates a slippery surface (think ice-skating rink!) and wax takes time to apply and makes recoating (see Tackling Simple Wood Floor Problems) difficult. Don't use straight ammonia, alkaline products or abrasive cleaners. They'll dull or scratch the finish. Do use a floor-cleaning product recommended by the floor finisher or opt for plain soap and water. If the recommended product is hard to find or costly, and other floor cleaners contain ingredients that violate your floor's warranty, try soap and water. I add a quarter cup of mild or pH-neutral soap (like liquid dishwashing soap) or Murphy Oil Soap (despite the name, it doesn't contain oil) to a bucket of water. Don't rely on water alone or a vinegar and water solution to clean hardwood floors. Mopping with water will result in dingy-looking floors and won't-budge dirt buildup. Vinegar and water is not as effective as soapy water and—some suggest—may dull floors sooner. (Eventual dullness and the need to recoat are inevitable no matter what you use. See Tackling Simple Wood Floor Problems.) Routine Cleaning In high-traffic areas, like the dining room and kitchen, you should sweep daily, if possible, and mop once or twice a week. Mop less-trafficked areas once a month or once a season. Mopping Technique Remember: Water is wood's worst enemy (even on sealed floors!), so use a damp mop rather than a soaking wet one. Dip the mop into the bucket of prepared cleaning solution, wring it out completely, mop in the direction of the wood grain and repeat. When the water gets dirty, empty the bucket, mix a new batch of cleaning solution and continue mopping. When finished, go back over the entire surface with clean water to rinse. Don't be afraid to get on your hands and knees if necessary. When a floor needs serious attention, I clean it with a cloth. (It's better than a sponge because you can "feel" the dirt as you wipe!) Tackling Simple Wood Floor Problems Scuff marks getting you down? A bit of baking soda on a damp sponge will erase them. Noticed a stubborn food, water or grease stain on your surface-sealed floor? Always use a commercial cleaner to treat this problem. Hairline cracks in the floor? Don't panic and attempt to fill them. Dry heat during the winter months causes wood floors to shrink and crack. Cracks should close up during the summer (though using a humidifier can also help). Finish looking dull? Sand the floor lightly and recoat with an additional layer or two. Recoating is necessary about every five to seven years.