Maureen Giuliano - Classified Realty Group


Classified Realty Group



Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 1/11/2019

Resolutions are well on their way with the New Year. If organizing your kitchen is one of yours here are some tips to help get it going. 

Getting started

Figure out how you want the space you do have to work, enabling you to measure out the type of organization you need. For instance, if it is a pantry shelf that you put baking odds and ends on then deep, thin trays could be ideal. No need to make a fuss over its label in the store either: if the shelf is tall enough then a magazine holder can do the job while also giving you more design options from which to choose. 

If there is something bigger that you replenish frequently, it is probably a good idea to get large, reusable containers to fit your space for holding your flour, rice, cereal, beans, sugar, etc. These are more easily organized and moved around when you are using your kitchen. 

Do spices leave you searching the cabinet for the right one to do the job? 

Get matching spice bottles. Label each container and stick it to the bottom of your cabinets over the kitchen counter space with Velcro. Or, affix magnets to them and utilize a metal surface such as the side of the refrigerator to organize them on. They will always be easy to find and leave that extra cabinet open for other storage needs.

Is your under-sink cabinet a mess?

Under the sink can become a nightmare if not kept in order through some system. There are many tools designed to combat clutter in the battle for organization in this spot. Attach cabinet door organizers to the inside or hang them over the edge of the door. These are great for anything from cleaning bottles to small items like sponges and such. Adhesive hooks work well for lightweight items designed for hanging like brushes or cloths. A bonus—these hooks can also be used to hang brooms, mops, and dusters on the wall alongside the refrigerator or inside the pantry. 

Re-purpose organizing tools for your needs.

Items such as towel racks, dish drying racks, and even letter holders accomplish any purpose that you need. Towel racks, for example, can also be mounted to help store and organize pan lids. Desktop-style letter holders can hold pans and baking sheets upright or hung on the sides to use wall space for smaller items. 

Use what you can to keep your mind calm.

Let your imagination work for you and don’t allow clutter to keep you from enjoying your kitchen to its fullest this year. Be on the lookout for organization hacks that work for you and your kitchen but most importantly don’t forget to use them!




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 3/30/2018

Whether you have a free-standing pantry, or a dedicated room for storing your kitchen essentials, there’s certain things that you should do to make sure your pantry is organized and that you have easy access to all of your items. Here’s some tips for good organization in your kitchen pantry: Be Careful With Stacking Canned Goods If you stack large items with other smaller items, such as different sized canned goods, it can pose a problem. An alternative to this storage dilemma is that of using risers. If you don’t want to put risers in because you feel that they’ll take up too much space, remember that these storage tools are giving you space in a different sense. However you choose to stack your canned goods, remember that the shortest item should be in the front. Organizing your canned goods by height can help to save you time and space. Store Open Items In Airtight Containers Items that have been opened should be stored in an airtight container with a lid. This can save you money by keeping items fresh. Also, you and your family will know what food items have been opened and need to be finished up before new items are ripped open. Keep cereals, crackers, cookies and even pet food fresh with the use of this simple tactic. Stacking Bins Save Space If you’re like most of America, your town probably recycles. Consider getting stacking bins for the pantry or kitchen area to place recyclables in. Make sure these bins aren’t too large. This way, you’ll be on top of taking the recycling outside to where it needs to be. This organizing tip helps to keep your kitchen clean. Also, be sure that these containers are easy to open for your convenience. Categorize Your Snack Foods Your kitchen pantry area will stay much more organized if you keep things in categories. Cookies and other sweet snacks should stay on one shelf in one area. Snacks for the kids should be easy to grab for little hands (that is of course if the kids have free reign over the kitchen!) Savory and salty snacks are a different category that will be on a completely different shelf and area. Baskets can be a great accessory for single-serve items. Boxes that snack items come in often take up a lot of space that could be better used. Bags of chips and other items are the same way. These bagged items can be transferred to sealable containers. Baskets are also easy to carry around if you’re offering a choice of snacks. Be sure you have clips to close bags and packages to keep snack items fresh. How Deep Is Your Shelf? Be mindful when it comes to shelving items like bottles that are all the same size. This can make things hard to find. These types of items are often best stored on a lazy Susan, or other type of turn-style storage that easily spins and allows you to see what’s available for your cooking use. This way, you’ll never have to move a bunch of things to find what you’re looking for! These kitchen pantry storage tips will help you to stay organized and save time both cooking and cleaning.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 3/24/2017

Thankfully, the human brain is usually a pretty efficient mechanism for keeping our lives organized, healthy, and safe.

However, when we're rushed, overwhelmed, or feeling stressed, important tasks, safety measures, and priorities are sometimes forgotten.

Most of the time, this does not pose an imminent health or safety threat, but there are exceptions. Fortunately, there are often simple solutions available and preventative measures we can take.

Finding high-tech (or low-tech) ways to remember important things can provide you and your family with improved home safety, more peace of mind, and other benefits.

Here are a few strategies for overcoming the pitfalls of occasional forgetfulness.

  • Practice present moment awareness. You'll tend to be happier, healthier, and safer when you condition your mind to stay in the present moment as much as possible. Although there is a lot of value in planning for the future and dwelling on happy memories, it's counterproductive to worry about problems that might never happen or regret things from the past that can't be changed. People waste a lot of energy and create self-imposed stress when they spend more than a few seconds worrying or regretting. Staying focused on the present moment also has some health and safety implications worth mentioning. For example, how many times have you left the house (or gone to bed) and wondered if you locked the door, turned off the oven, or unplugged the iron? Getting yourself in the habit of bringing your mind back to the task at hand and being more aware of what you're doing will help you avoid some of these potential dangers, concerns, and distracting  thoughts.
  • Set an alarm as a reminder. If you set an alarm on your mobile device or computer to remind yourself to get ready for an appointment, send an important email, make a phone call, or check on the progress of dinner in the oven, then you never have to worry about getting distracted and losing track of time.
  • Good habits can be a lifesaver. Going through a mental inventory before you leave the house or go to bed can help reduce forgetfulness about locking doors, turning off kitchen appliances, and reactivating the smoke alarm. And speaking of smoke alarms, the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA) recommends that homeowners check the batteries in their smoke detectors once a month and replace them with fresh batteries at least once a year. It also urges people to completely replace their smoke alarms every 10 years. Important safety note: The federal agency strongly discourages people from removing smoke detector batteries to silence the device while cooking. Instead, it recommends opening a window, waving a towel at the alarm to clear the air [a paper plate also works], pressing a "hush" button if the unit has one, or moving the alarm several feet away from the cooking area.
While you can't always depend on old-fashioned memory techniques like tying a string around your finger, effective ways to jog your memory can range from using cell phone alarms and appointment-reminder software to low-tech strategies like Post-it notes, to-do lists, wall calendars, and calendar books.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 10/23/2015

Clutter often takes many years to accumulate and will take some time to eliminate. Just remember that de-cluttering is an ongoing lifestyle not a finite project. Many people feel overwhelmed and fear just the thought of de-cluttering the home. It doesn’t have to be that excruciating, there are actually some creative ways to get started. Getting started can be the hardest part. You have to begin your war against clutter one draw or cabinet at a time. Just pick one area of the house and focus on that. It is best to start a de-cluttering session by designating one hour a day to it. If that still seems over whelming for you, start with five minutes a day. You will be surprised what you can accomplish in the clutter war in just five minutes. Remember that any type of progress is better than none. The important thing is to make sure to stick with it each day, or even every other day. Avoid planning an all day de-cluttering session that involves your whole house, as you will never get around to it. Donate or dispose of items you no longer have any use for. Look at items that you feel an attachment to and ask yourself the following three questions: Do I love it? Will I have a need for it again within 3 months? Will I miss it if I throw it away? If you answered no to the questions then you can safely dispose of the item. If you answered a definite yes to these questions, take those items and put them into an organizational bin. Once the bin is full place it in an out of way place in your home and revisit it in about 6 months. If you were able to go that long without needing anything from the bin, chances are it is time to donate or dispose of the items. Don’t forget charitable donations to the Salvation Army and Goodwill, etc. are tax deductible. Probably one of the best ways to let your junk go is to watch an episode of Hoarders on television.





Posted by Maureen Giuliano on 3/13/2015

Spring has sprung, and it is time to get the house in tip top shape. Traditionally Spring is when most homeowners do a thorough cleaning and organizing. Organize Your Shed Spring-cleaning means not only giving everything a good wipe-down but decluttering your space to welcome the warmer seasons ahead. Follow these tips and you'll breathe a sigh of spring relief. For storing everyday garden and home tools, wood lattice is even handier than a basic trellis. Choose a heavy-duty variety, sold in sheets at hardware stores and lumberyards, and screw it onto a door using spacers. Then hang implements from S hooks, which fit snugly in the diamond framework. For items that can't be hung, attach broom clamps or suspend binder clips from hook. Tackle Your Garden Cleanup Streamline your round of gardening chores by sorting debris as you go. Throw biodegradable waste into a wheelbarrow, ready to dump on the compost heap when you're finished. Keep other yard trash -- labels, broken pots, and rocks, for example -- separate in a bucket hung over the barrow's edge with a large S hook. Tame Your New Plants Here's an attractive way to prevent invasive plants such as dwarf bamboo from overrunning your garden: Plant them in terra-cotta chimney flue tiles. Use a tile with a diameter that is at least 4 inches wider than the plant's root ball. Sink the tile into the soil so that the lip sticks up 1 inch; plant inside the tile. Save Time with a Spring-Cleaning Bucket For easier spring-cleaning, fill a bucket with basics that need to be toted from room to room: all-purpose and glass-cleaning sprays, a sponge, a toothbrush, a squeegee, a scrub brush, hopsacking, and terry-cloth towels in washcloth and hand-towel sizes. Between tasks, hang rubber gloves over the rim to dry. Document Your Expiration Dates Putting warranty expiration dates on appliance boxes lets you know when it's safe to throw those cartons away. To store the receipt and warranty slips, place them in a cellophane bag. Write or type the expiration date on a self-adhesive label, and affix it to the bag. Attach the bag to the box with double-sided tape. Protect Your Stored Clothing Take a deep breath: Aromatic herbs like rosemary, cinnamon, lavender, and balsam can keep clothing and shoes smelling fresh; cedar can help protect woolens from moth damage. Prepare for Summer Fun Now's the time to make sure you have sunblock, mosquito repellant, and citronella candles. A pail filled with these summer staples makes a thoughtful gift for the host of the season's first cookout.